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S. O. S. MISSING CHRISTMAS TREE BULBS

S. O. S. MISSING CHRISTMAS TREE BULBS

According to the 1918 Marconi Yearbook of Wireless Telegraphy and Telephony S. O. S stands for absolutely nothing and you shouldn’t even add the period after each letter. How do I know this? Well, it wasn’t because I read the book, because that little baby will cost you upwards of $120.00 or more. I read it here, researching only when I decided on S. O. S. as the name for this essay. I added periods because SOS looks a little weird as though I misspelled a word and looks very short. You could miss this distress message very easily, so I added even more specifics.

  • SOS – the letters represented by the radio telegraphic signal (…—…) used, especially by ships in distress, as an internationally recognized call for help.

Actually the purpose of this essay is because I am in distress. Distress over not being able to find a certain replacement bulb for my vintage ceramic Christmas tree. A tree I grew up with. A tree Andrew hates. (he has no taste) A tree given to me by my mother before she passed away. Having five children, I have no idea how I ended up being the lucky inheritor. I’m glad I did.

Be as it may, I have the tree and there are many bulbs missing. I have been researching for weeks on the internet and calling local ceramic shops looking for this one certain bulb to match the others. Sure I could change them all out to a different style, but I WANT THIS SPECIFIC BULB. When you want it, you want it.

Missing In Action!

MISSING IN ACTION

I’ve been directed to ebay, etsy, and to Amazon. I’ve been told it’s rare and was discontinued thirty years ago. Sounds about right to me from the date of my tree. Maybe I missed something, but out of the 2456 listings I’ve looked at, I’ve come to the conclusion it is nowhere to be found. Yeah, I think that’s about how many listings I’ve been through.

So I’m sending out my distress signal to you, my blogging buddies. Have you seen this bulb? It’s missing in action. The size is about 1 and 1/8th inch long including the stem. The diameter of the stem is about 1/8th inch. I’m guessing is considered a small bulb because I doubt a smaller stem would be made. I’m not going to say I’d pay a grand amount for them because I know they are rare, but let’s see what we can come up with. Thanks for your help. Looking forward to some positive answers.

LET'S LIGHT THIS TREE!

LET’S LIGHT THIS TREE!

~Elle

 

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About Elle Knowles

Elle Knowles lives in the Florida Panhandle with her husband and off-at-college-most-of-the-time son. She has four daughters, one son, and eleven beautiful grandchildren. 'Crossing the Line' is her first novel. The sequel 'What Line' is a work in progress. Recently published is Coffee-Drunk Or Blind - a nonfiction story of homesteading in the Alaska wilderness with her parents and four siblings, told through letters by her mother and remembered accounts from the family.

26 responses »

  1. Maybe visit a flea market—You might be able to find a tree that is identical to yours, and you could use it for “replacement parts.”

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  2. Hope you find them. If I see some, I’ll grab them for you.

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  3. Ah, I do remember those from my childhood – sadly now replaced by much flimsier stuff. But we still get the twinkle, which is what really counts. Good luck with the search!

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  4. Hey Elle, it looks like you might have a shot of landing some bulbs, and I’m happy to hear that. Got my fingers crossed that you get them. I remember my grandmother have a tree similar to that one. I like em.

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  5. I wish I could help you with the bulb, but I’m clueless as to where you might find one (an antique store)? What really grabbed me was the post itself and the photo of your tree. I grew up with one of those, too, but had completely forgotten about it until I saw your pic. Then it was like a door opened in my head and the memory rushed back. My older sister made one of those ceramic trees for my mother. I remember it being displayed on a side table each holiday season but have no idea what became of it.

    Thanks for a fond memory. I do hope you find your bulb!

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  6. Have you tried your local Thrift Shops? I go every week to ours and the treasures old and new are never disappointing. I found a part to my mother’s juice squeezer that is at least 40 years old! Best of luck

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  7. Okay, I’ll keep my fingers crossed that you’ll find your wayward bulb, have you looked in the last place you’d expect it to be?. Elle, if you spot the bulb, please check for odd socks, pens & pencils, chargers, why these things, oh and not forgetting

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  8. My thoughts here, will not be popular. But have you considered that it’s time to give it up?

    Yes, I understand about the heritage from one’s mother. Very important. What will happen when the next bulb gives out or goes missing?

    If your bulb turns up? Maybe it, still, will be time to wrap it up and do whatever? I’ve read your posts Elle. On the older house you live in and how that heritage is not fit for today, etc. So, maybe it is time to let this go too? Best wishes, Cheers Jamie.

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    • Lol! This is the first year I’ve really searched for this bulb and I need at least 30 of them. I may have to settle for a newer bulb. Also, this tree is minimal, to say the least, of what H holds on to! Need any furniture? His is wall to wall! I’ve given most of my inherited items to my kids one by one. There may be a battle looming for this tree though. ~Elle

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      • Don’t let it stress you out any Elle, it may be about time to buy a new garland of fairy lights,and to put your precious inherited set somewhere safe, enabling you to have another check for 30, make that 40 bulbs before Crimble 2016? ~ Lynda

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