RSS Feed

Hoping For A Diamond In The Rough

Hoping For A Diamond In The Rough

As you can see from these pictures we have a little bit of everything out in the workroom. Inherited from H’s dad, it holds memories and tools from your basic screwdriver, old oil pumps, old carbetators for long-gone cars, and a hand held drill. 


We even have an outboard motor. It’s vintage. It’s seen better days. Does it work? I doubt it. 


If I had a nickel for every screwdriver cluttering up Dad’s Workroom, I’d be rich. I should hold a contest and the winner gets to keep the extras – which are – believe me – a lot! 

Need a screw? We got you covered. Some tangled wiring? We have enough to circle the globe. A measuring cup for anything not consumable is in your face every time you open the door. Extra license plates for your car are available if you need one, or two, or three…



Two vintage chest of drawers I’d love to refurbish, but as always there is no room in this small house for more furniture. 



This nice little drawer thingy would make a great piece to store threads and bobbins in or even some of my writing tools. What it holds now? I’m afraid to open it! 


H is finally cleaning out the workroom. He keeps more than I think he needs to keep. It’s junk to me. Memories to him. As long as he keeps hauling the boxes of goods to the outside storage shed we finally got erected, I don’t care. Anything he puts in there I don’t have to look at. 

​​
I should have take some before pictures. These are before the finished project, but after the beginning. Huge difference already. We can see the floor. Maybe we’ll find something of monetary value. 

It’s been a long time coming so I’m not complaining…

~Elle

Advertisements

About Elle Knowles

Elle Knowles lives in the Florida Panhandle with her husband and off-at-college-most-of-the-time son. She has four daughters, one son, and eleven beautiful grandchildren. 'Crossing the Line' is her first novel. The sequel 'What Line' is a work in progress. Recently published is Coffee-Drunk Or Blind - a nonfiction story of homesteading in the Alaska wilderness with her parents and four siblings, told through letters by her mother and remembered accounts from the family.

18 responses »

  1. We only have a few tools that once belonged to my father-in-law, but I’m often surprised how sturdy they are and how well they work after all these years.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  2. I went through the same thing with my father-in-law’s stuff. It seems like that generation of men never threw anything out.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    • I know Gail. What is with that? H’s mother was the same way but she blamed it all on his dad! H is so sentimental it’s hard for him to discard their stuff even when he knows it’s junk…

      Like

      Reply
      • In my case, I don’t think H was so much troubled with parting from it all as much as pained from the labor of it; going through what seemed like mountains of stuff. Seeing space cleared motivated me whereas the whole experience wore him out physically and mentally.

        Liked by 1 person

        Reply
  3. So when exactly did you come and take pictures of my husband’s barn? I could have written this and had oodles of photos that look so similar.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  4. Why is there a spaghetti strainer hanging on the wall in that last photo? That made me laugh!

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    • Lol! I had to go to the picture to find that! I never even noticed! Remember those pictures where you have to find certain items? This could be one of those pics! My daughter asked why there was a measuring cup hanging on a string. I have to laugh to keep from crying at this mess. It’s slowly getting cleaned up though! What people keep!!!

      Like

      Reply
  5. Reminds me of those “I Spy” books my kids loved, well, still love. Looks like a great collection of treasures!!

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  6. The pictures make it look like a large space but I know too well it isn’t.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  7. Actually, old tools are in big demand from those with an interest. Something over approx. 50 years. There are people that collect them. Like hammers, etc. For there is a good deal of diversity with the older designs. You might search out the internet to find them ….https://finetools.com/pages/beginners-guide-to-tool-collecting

    Cheers Jamie

    Liked by 2 people

    Reply

I only have one rule - Leave me your thoughts! ;)

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: